Search
  • Rosie Iles-Jonas

Path of the Warrior

Shambhala is the name given to a mythical kingdom in Asia, where everyone enjoyed harmony and health. The enlightened society was made possible because they believed in the inherent goodness in themselves and others. They have discovered the basic goodness of human life and radiate that goodness out into the world.

It's both a mythical place and a philosophy that doesn't belong to any one culture or religious tradition, but it can be found in many of them. We learn that the sacred warrior conquers the world through gentleness, courage and self knowledge.


In Shambhala; The Sacred Path of the Warrior by Chögyam Trungpa we learn that the key to warriorship and the first principle of Shambhala is not being afraid of who you are, not being afraid of yourself.

If I hadn't read anymore, that's already a big piece of work isn't it? To sit with ourselves and recognise how much time and energy has been wasted not being ourselves. And the painful period of recovery after even a single occasion of inauthenticity. Why were we pretending, especially when it only ever takes us further away from this place of of harmony and health.


The path of a warrior is to recognise that all beings are good, and that life is worth living. That's right; all beings, not just the ones you like. (It's harder than it first appeared!) To be a warrior requires bravery and to reflect on our own heart and mind. It's deep work. Warriors learn that in the face of challenge we can be both heroic and kind at the same time.


The way I teach yoga and meditation is to make suggestions and invite students to explore movement. This fosters an attitude of curiosity, which can be a real balm for the self judgment often present. Movements are lead by sensation, students feel good, and they make kind choices.


In a class, we are our own Shambhala right here in Hove (and all over the place courtesy of Zoom). Other students are influenced by your kind movement choices, and they go on to make them long after the session. They're acting from a place of peace within themselves.

While everyone has a responsibility to help the world, we can create additional chaos if we try to impose our ideas or help upon others.


So; take what you like from this, and leave behind the rest.


Click here for details of my 10 week open level yoga and meditation course.

Rosie Iles-Jonas

Yoga Teacher

Postgraduate at SOAS University

Yoga and Somatics for Healing with Charlotte Watts