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  • Rosie Iles-Jonas

Be in Flow

To be in flow requires riding the wave of constant change.

I've taken a lot of comfort from Daoism this last year, and really enjoyed sharing teachings in classes. So it's high time I write to you about it.


The Dao signifies the dynamic, creative and ever changing nature of things. All experiences are likened to flowing water. And what a beautiful example of flowing water we have here.


This image captures a single moment in time. Different paths, speeds and depths of water. A gentle flow, over time turns into a deep channel, like the one we see on the right. These expressions of water are like our passions and interests. They might start as a little trickle, but over time, that drip drip affect creates clear pathways.


Yoga and meditation are like this. We dip our toe into practices and feel the ripples of that action. It's not uncommon to approach yoga and step away. -Very much like watching children on the beach; they're drawn to the sea. they walk very close to the water and a wave rises up and soaks their shoes. They run away screaming. Only to turn around and run back towards the sea.


We're drawn to the sea, just as we're drawn to yoga and meditation. It's the ebb and flow, the permission to be in constant state of change. And certainly when it comes to bodies of water, one of the things we find so beautiful about them, the tidal flow. A healthy river or ocean needs to be flowing, rather than stagnant. We know that inherently about water, and it's the same for the body, the vast majority of which is liquid.


My free flowing class runs tonight, and every Wednesday if you'd like to join us. Click here for details. But you don't need me, put some music on, or arrange peace and quiet, get low to the ground and move instinctively.